Day4_14

GraphExpo_ShowDaily_September_28_2016

Gilson Graphics Goes for Integrated Effi ciency in High-end Print Installs EFI VUTEk, Fiery and Midmarket Print Suite Products. Gilson Graphics, Grand Rapids, MI, has raised the level of what it can offer to customers with several new technology purchases from EFI (Booth 1349). Gilson’s superwide-format inkjet graphics operation now includes the versatile and energy-efficient EFI VUTEk LX3 Pro hybrid roll/fl atbed LED printer, complete with an EFI Fiery proServer Premium digital front end (DFE). Gilson Graphics uses EFI Fiery DFEs and Fiery Central integration hub software in some of its cut-sheet digital printing operations. Plus, the company is making comprehensive improvements in its company-wide production workfl ow, upgrading to the latest-version EFI Midmarket Print Suite. The Suite is built around the core EFI Pace MIS/ERP technology and features new tools that will allow Gilson Graphics to integrate and effi ciently manage superwide format graphics printing and its entire range of general commercial print offerings. The company also has taken advantage of advanced components in the workfl ow suite for shop-fl oor data collection, fulfi llment, marketing automation, Web-to-print, and more. A leader in superwide-format In each of the past few years, Gilson has grown 35%, expanding from one shift per day to operating 24 hours a day, six days a week. The company’s strong marketing and customer service with retailers has generated even greater demand for superwide-format graphics, which left the company looking for a way to handle a larger volume of work. The new VUTEk LED printer was the ideal choice for a variety of reasons. One is that Gilson has had an excellent partnership with EFI for a number of years, according to Gilson Graphics VP of Operations David Oswald. Company executives also liked that the printer and its Fiery DFE integrate with the Midmarket Suite MIS Gilson Graphics already uses. “The integration between Fiery and the Midmarket Suite is important to us in that it requires only one touch point for data collection and inventory management,” Oswald says. “That’s a nice bonus and from an effi ciency standpoint saves me time because I’m tied into a system that my team already understands and utilizes.” Getting the Brand Back Together G7 extends its scope with a new program for smaller and mid-size brands. Tackling the challenges faced by brand owners, and by extension their print providers, was the topic of interest at a late Monday morning press conference at the Idealliance Solutions Theater (Booth 1009). Ron Ellis, a G7/G7 PC Expert and Master Trainer, as well as a consultant working with brands and agencies, addressed the issues, exploring fi rst the surprisingly signifi cant communication challenges of brand owners. “You’d be amazed how often people buying print do not communicate what they need,” he said. Additional challenges include maintaining brand appearance so that colors remain the same throughout the supply chain; achieving consistent quality; getting the right results on schedule and according to timetables; and attaining consistency across the globe, whether in Asia, Europe, North or South America, or anywhere in between. “That is diffi cult because the substrates are different everywhere in the world,” Ellis noted. Today, brand colors are governed not only by visual color assessments, but also by numbers-based scoring systems that rate color quality, he explained. G7 has extended its scope with a new brand program for smaller and mid-size brands, Ellis said. The program calls for communication by brands as to what they seek, as well as assessment by brands. Recognition and training are the fi nal program components. Taking each one of these components separately, brand communication should include written specifi cations and acknowledgement of those specs by print providers, Ellis said. Acknowledgement is key, because print vendors often have their own specifi cations that become the “default specs” if the vendor hasn’t acknowledged the brand’s primacy. Discussion and support with supply chains should work out all details of the assignment, “so there are no surprises,” Ellis said. “Just by communicating effectively, brands can save substantial amounts—up to 5%—and that’s a lot of money to many brands.” The assessment step calls for audit and validation. It should verify the printer has the equipment and expertise to produce to specifi cations, which should include on-site and remote audits, Ellis reported. It should further verify the printer can produce a proof that aligns with brand proofs and verify the printer can produce a printed product. The recognition and training piece refers to the fact that many brands believe if they are going to work with a printer, they want to see a certifi cation, such as G7, G7 PC, Pantone, or others. “These certifi cations mean you have reached a certain level of competency,” Ellis said. “The industry standards are pretty helpful. They provide a good foundation for brand standards and also provide ways to convey expectations.” Before closing the discussion about meeting brand expectations, Ellis took time to mention SCHMO, a new program focused on spot color predictability. “Watch for SCHMO; you’ll see that technology coming through,” he exhorts. “In six months to a year, it should be pretty standard.” HP Redefi nes Book Printing HP (Booth 1825) offered a look at the book of the future at Monday’s Print Media Centr’s Printerverse (Booth 701) Case Study Café, when author, printer, publisher, and vendor got together to discuss Unsquaring the Wheel, an educational title written by Dr. Joe Webb, Chris Bondi, and Wayne Peterson. Designed to help print businesses redefi ne themselves for a new generation, the book is also designed to take advantage of a new paradigm in educational book publishing. Produced using HP’s One Book workfl ow for printing “book of one” titles, the book also includes rich media—aka augmented reality (AR)—content. The cover, for example, includes an invisible digital watermark that, when scanned by a smartphone running HP’s Link app, accesses personalized content, in this case a video featuring HP’s David Murphy. The One Book system addresses one of the biggest issues plaguing producers of short-run and on-demand book titles. “One Book helped keep all the components together during production,” said Michael Corbett, Director of Operations of Toronto’s Webcom, the company that printed Unsquaring the Wheel. Those elements included the book block, the covers, and variable content. “Link allows you to connect to the ‘Internet of Things,’” said Christine Echeverria, Customer Applications Manager, HP Pagewide Web Press division. “You can have a personalized book that will greet you by name.” The applications for both book of one and Link for the education and textbook markets are virtually infi nite. “It’s a natural way to introduce different content,” said Corbett. Many of Webcom’s customers are textbook publishers. “You can customize a book for a specifi c class,” said Marc Johnsen, Marketing Manager, Core PageWide Web Press, HP. And, added Dr. Joe Webb, “you can create the books with the modules you want.” The technology also revolutionizes how authors interact with readers. “It gives you the ability to have a one-to-one relationship with the reader,” said Johnsen. For printers and publishers, the question is how to monetize it. Not all publishers relish the idea of getting into video production or creating the rich media content that the Link app accesses, but that’s where the opportunity may lie. This doesn’t fi t the usual model of book publishing but, said Dr. Webb, “Change the model. This is true for innovation in general.” 14 | September 28, 2016 | GRAPH EXPO 16 Offi cial Show Daily | PrintingNews.com


GraphExpo_ShowDaily_September_28_2016
To see the actual publication please follow the link above