Day4_16

GraphExpo_ShowDaily_September_28_2016

Two Sides North America Annual Seminar 2016 Two Sides North America continues to promote the sustainability of the graphics communication industry and dispel common environmental misconceptions. During its seminar at GRAPH EXPO 16, the organization outlined how it continues to show why print and paper is an attractive, practical, and sustainable communications medium. According to Mary Anne Hansan, Executive Director, Paper and Packaging Board, the organization is working to slow the decline in the use of paper, and increase the demand of paper-based packaging. Over the past year, they have promoted its “How Life Unfolds” campaign to consumers aged 18-to-49 in attempt to get the younger generation to request paper-based packaging. To reach the consumer identifi ed as “expressives,” they are using national television, major newspaper and magazine advertising, as well as social media and online video. Survey data from the campaign’s fi rst year shows that the message is reaching the audience, and attitudes about the importance of paper and packaging are improving. Martyn Eustace, Managing Director, Two Sides, shared the organization’s success on fi ghting greenwashing on a global level. Greenwashing was used by 377 leading European banks, utilities, telecom, and insurance companies. Print Power, working with Two Sides, has been able to get 168 of those companies to change their message. Campaigns continue in Europe as to “why print works.” In North America, Phil Riebel, President, Two Sides North America, reported a primary initiative is to fi ght greenwashing messages here. Two Sides NA has stopped greenwashing messages from such companies as Wells Fargo, ATT, Starbucks, American Express, Citibank, and Capital One. The top 28 companies that removed claims had more than $584 billion in U.S. revenue. Two Sides NA was able to challenge these companies because of U.S. Federal Trade Commission environmental marketing rules. Two Sides is aligned with other initiatives such as Paper and Packaging Board, AFPA, NPTA, and Consumer for Paper Options to fi ght the misleading claims. Two Sides continues to promote “going paperless doesn’t save trees” and has more than Mary Anne Hansan with the Paper and Packaging Board, spoke in detail about its “How Life Unfolds” campaign to promote the use of paper and packaging to the younger generation. 150 North American members, including 12 universities and industry trade associations. Optimize Prime: Transforming Your Workfl ow Keep your company profi table with an automated workfl ow. If printing companies expect to have a future, they need to introduce automated workflows into their businesses. According to the Print Media Centr (Booth 701) Printerverse panel, “Optimize Prime: Transforming Your Workfl ow,” avoiding the cost of a workfl ow system could mean going out of business. Workfl ow experts took questions from both an online audience and attendees at GRAPH EXPO 16. They all agreed that that purpose of an automatic workfl ow is to eliminate manual labor or add value for the customer. Printers must look at changing how they do business if they want to be profi table. Where a workfl ow begins depends on the printer’s needs, said Tod Viniski, WW Marketing Manager, Xerox (Booth 1625). A classic formal print workfl ow starts when the job hits the production fl oor. Others see workfl ows starting with the creator. “Printers have a lot of choices now that they didn’t have before,” he said. “Systems are scalable so it is easy to start small, grow, and integrate automation into your business. You don’t have to do everything at once and have the high risk costs.” Several online audience members were interested in how to get their managers to be more open to change and add automation. Joe Ferrara, Solutions Development Manager, Ricoh (Booth 2035), recommended looking at the best processes in the industry. “Managers and owners are looking for what an automated workfl ow will mean to the ROI. They will be convinced with believable cast studies that show the savings and productivity. Ricoh has a ton of case studies online to help you make your case.” Kevin Goeminne, CEO, Chili Publish (Booth 2266), cited three different case studies. An automated workfl ow used by a German printer allows them to change the selling prices three to four times a day for online ordering. A label producer added the ability to personalize labels automatically and increase value. A card company cut its delivery time to less than 12 hours with an automated workfl ow. One way to get management to adopt an automated workfl ow is to translate a business problem into an actionable item. Paul Abdool, VP, Enterprise Solutions, Solimar Systems (Booth 841), said to fi nd where automation might increase profi ts or lower costs. “One printer added an automated workfl ow because the company had a hiring freeze and the system controlled labor costs.” Stefan Karlsson, CTO, arifi Q Development (Booth 618), recommended looking at the different production processes and automating what will benefi t you fi rst. He cites a case study where his automated estimating system allowed sales people to get out of the offi ce and price jobs immediately. According to Karlsson, 30% of purchases are made from the fi rst printer to get the price to the customer. The biggest missed opportunity in automated workfl ow may be from printers who already have the equipment and software. Tom Bouman, WW Workfl ow & DFE Product Manager, HP (Booth 1825), suggested that if you have the equipment, use a “crawl, walk, run” approach. Take simple processes that are easier to automate and get them started. “Even the simple act of automating prefl ighting can get the job completed faster and improve quality throughout production.” The New Premedia: Closing the Loop David Hunter, Founder of Pilot Marketing Group, is one of fi ve G7 Expert Trainers in the world, and taught the fi rst G7 courses in Europe and Israel. He also has logged more than 30 years in marketing graphically-oriented computer solutions. These qualifi cations made him the ideal choice to lead GRAPH EXPO 16 attendees through a talk called, “The New Premedia: Closing the Loop.” Hunter presented the program late Tuesday morning at the Idealliance Solutions Theater (Booth 1009). The presentation focused on CMP, also known as Color Management Professional, an Idealliance online training program. The CMP certifi cation program consists of a series of online color management training courses and exams. Color Management Professional Premedia addresses the principles of color management with a focus on premedia and prepress, offering key insights into color management throughout the production workfl ow. The course is recommended for print, prepress, and premedia production professionals and managers. Those enrolling in the course are urged to take as a prerequisite the CMP Fundamentals course, which walks students through basic color theory, graphic communication workfl ows, and print production processes. The CMP module setups are as follows: Part 1 focuses on color strategies for prepress color control. This includes determining aims for fi le processing, determining strategies for color reproduction, and determining viewing conditions; Part 2 examines the issue of auditing your process. “In order to make your process better, you must understand where you’re coming from,” Hunter told attendees. Part 3 looks at assessing and optimizing workfl ow; Part 3B at optimizing fi les for digital; Part 4 at assessing and optimizing printing; Part 5 at assessing and optimizing plating; and Part 6 focuses David Hunter, Pilot Marketing Group, outlined the new Idealliance Color Management Professional online training program now available. on “closing the loop” between customer and manufacturing, including communicating expectations, processing fi les and proving results. 16 | September 28, 2016 | GRAPH EXPO 16 Offi cial Show Daily | PrintingNews.com


GraphExpo_ShowDaily_September_28_2016
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