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GraphExpo_ShowDaily_September_28_2016

Production Digital Print Beyond Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black With the exception of a few devices, production color digital printing of documents has primarily been a process color world, where everything is reproduced with cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks or toners. Many years ago, however, market leaders at the high end envisioned opportunities with value-added special effects beyond process color. They implemented the use of spot colors, clear toners, dimensional, and other effects that took advantage of the unique capabilities of digital print, namely the ability to personalize, on-demand print, and just-in-time manufacture documents that could not easily be reproduced using conventional methods. These trailblazers showed how production digital print could push beyond the short runs and quick turnarounds of much process color work. In time, others followed, bringing special effects like white, clear, and metallic (silver and gold) to a new class of users. The market expansion over the last few years has been dramatic, not only with printing systems supporting more than process color, but also with a new class of off-line devices (mostly leveraging UV inkjet technologies) that produce a range of innovative effects. Still, we are in the early days of this trend. Print service providers are looking for the best model to market, price, and sell these value-added special effects. Most designers are unaware that digital printing systems offer these capabilities. There is plenty of educational work and other research to be done. InfoTrends feels strongly that there is a new and growing opportunity in this area, and that’s why we are in the fi eld with a new research study called “Beyond CMYK: The Use of Special Effects in Digital Printing.” We expect this study to provide both research and market sizing to help demonstrate the impact of this trend. Category Value-added Special Effects Spot color Highlight colors, custom mixed colors (Pantone) Gamut expansion Red, Green, Blue (RGB), Orange, Green, Violet (OGV), Light Cyan, Light Magenta (Lc Lm), Light Black/Gray Specialty Metallic, foils, white, and fl uorescent toner/inks Coating Spot or fl ood coat of a clear matte, clear, gloss, or satin coating; can be used for watermarking and sometimes for scratch protection Textured Tactile, embossed or debossed effect Security MICR, UV GRAPH EXPO 16 will be a great opportunity to see a range of production color digital printing systems that offer the capability to produce special effects like these. GRAPH EXPO 16 exhibitors including HP (Booth 1825), Konica Minolta (Booth 1801), MGI (Booth 2149), Oki Data (Booth 1001), Ricoh (Booth 2035), Scodix (Booth 1037), and Xeikon (Booth 2849) offer these types of value-added effects in production color digital document systems. Keep an eye out as well for extended gamut and other effects in wide-format digital printing systems. G7 ‘Button’ Closer to Reality Introduced in January, 2016, the G7 Press Control System Certifi cation Program from Idealliance (Booth 1009) validates a press control system’s ability to monitor and control G7 gray balance and tonality in real time. Certifi ed G7 Press Control Systems allow print service providers to fully realize the benefi ts of the G7 methodology in their daily print production, not just as a one-time calibration event. INSTRUMENT FLIGHT technology from System Brunner is the world’s fi rst press control solution to pass the new G7 Press Control System Certifi cation Program. Idealliance reports: “The G7 Press Control System Certifi cation program certifi es a system capable of automatically monitoring and controlling a production press run according to G7 gray balance and tonality specifi cations. Systems such as INSTRUMENT FLIGHT elevate G7 from a calibration procedure to a complete process control system from prepress to pressroom like having a “G7 button” on your press.” While G7 is a well-proven methodology for calibrating printing systems, most offset press control systems still rely on traditional solid ink density measurements, with no way of monitoring and controlling G7’s mid-tone gray balance or neutral density aim values. Variations occur “Even when solid ink densities remain consistent on a G7-calibrated press, signifi cant mid-tone gray variations—as much as six to 12 Delta E—can occur during a production run, resulting in visible color shifts that must be corrected by ink key adjustments or other means, notes Don Hutcheson, of HutchColor, LLC, who directed the Idealliance G7 Press Control System Certifi cation Program development. “To aid these adjustments, the press operator needs a real-time indication of how gray balance and neutral density compares to the G7 aim values, and how each ink needs to be increased or decreased,” Hutcheson continues. Addressing the value of G7-based press control, Mike Graff, President and Chief Executive Offi cer of Sandy Alexander, Clifton, N.J., comments, “Sandy Alexander was one of the fi rst adopters of G7 and we continue to rely on its methodology to support our position in the industry as a quality leader. “As the fi rst adopter of System Brunner’s INSTRUMENT FLIGHT in the U.S,” he continues, “we are eager to benefi t from its new G7 capabilities, as we can now control the complete reproduction workfl ow from proof to printed sheet, according to G7 specifi cations. This system will help us maximize the value we get from G7—greater predictability, shorter makeready times, and more consistent printed results that meet the highest quality levels.” For information on the G7 Press Control Certifi cation Program go toidealliance.org/G7_Press_Control or contact Idealliance Senior Vice President Programming & Marketing Steve Bonoff at sbonoff@idealliance. org or 952/896-1908, or speak with Steve at the Idealliance booth (1009). Offi cial Show Daily | PrintingNews.com GRAPH EXPO 16 | September 28, 2016 | 27


GraphExpo_ShowDaily_September_28_2016
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