Day4_52

GraphExpo_ShowDaily_September_28_2016

Real World Lessons from the Plain Paper Pioneers Reaping benefi ts such as reduced inventory and storage costs, time savings, more impactful marketing, and enhanced personalization options were a few of the reasons cited by the early adopters of plain paper factories at GRAPH EXPO 16. In the session, hosted by Bell and Howell (Booth 849), the users explained how their mail production facilities can now rely on plain white paper rather than pre-printed shells, forms, and envelopes to improve profi tability and productivity. These pioneers using Bell and Howell’s Inveloper Finishing System discussed how it impacted their business. Using the Bell and Howell plain paper factory system, the Inveloper can produce full color, digitally printed individual mail pieces as well as digitally printed inserts. It will then cut the mail pieces and inserts using optimal space provided, minimizing or completely eliminating wasted material entirely. The Inveloper will then wrap each mail piece with digitally printed paper to create the envelope, accurately matching the correct envelope with the mail piece and insert. Envelopes can be produced in different sizes to accommodate any company’s needs and can be perforated, ready for the client. Better control of the look and message was an advantage for David Fox, Executive Vice President of Operations, Valpak. “Not only did the machine have better quality, time to market was reduced by three days. This is a major benefi t to our franchises. Because production employees now have more control over the process, it helped developed teamwork. “We were also able to add benefi ts,” said Fox. “Every 60,000 envelopes can have a different advertising message we can sell. We are exploring the possibility of offering targeted messages within the Valpak to specifi c homes within the normal 10,000 mailing. This is another benefi t of having that control.” Mark Durrett, VP of Marketing, Bell and Howell, moderates the panel on plain paper factories. There were challenges, Fox said, noting it took time to fi ne tune the glue so it wouldn’t open at the post offi ce. “How the envelop is opened by the consumer was a change we had to make sure didn’t affect our customers.” Robb Cass, President, AccuDoc Solutions, was the newest Inveloper user on the panel. His company streamlined inventory since they now know their volume for the entire year. He also saw a reduction in production hours and went from 22-hour work days to 10-hour work days. Said Cass, “Our biggest challenge was training our staff. We moved inserter operators to the Inveloper. Some got frustrated and one resigned. I wish I had changed the training process from 30 to 60 days.” Bill Gaddy, Senior Director, Broadridge Financial Solutions, got the equipment because he didn’t have the insertion capability to keep up with his mail volume. The new equipment has been a major cost benefi t. “We have no waste. We take a roll of paper and produce the envelope. We take the paper and wrap the mailing content. We can even put content into self-mailers.” For Gaddy, glue was an issue, especially in the hot regions. “Customers also complained the envelope was hard to open. We put perforations in and printed ‘open here.’ Other than that, we hit the ground running.” Print Media Centr’s Very Own Deborah Corn Wins the “Girlie Award” The third annual Girls Who Print Girlie Award ceremony was hosted by the Print Media Centr (Booth 701) at the Printerverse Theater Tuesday, September 27. A very surprised and speechless Deborah Corn accepted the award and adorned the bejeweled crown amid a large group of peers, friends, and colleagues. Cary Sherburne and Pat McGrew, two previous winners of the award, were adorned with tiaras as well. “When you start looking for someone who is a leader in your industry it is an interesting challenge,” said Pat McGrew. “All the people you work with and the people you know, they are your go–to–resources. This year’s award winner would tell you that they are not really an important part and they just make things happen; they introduce people to other people. This is someone who knows the printing industry and knows it at a buyer level, consumer level, and has over the past several years, has gotten smart about the digital side. She is my go–to–person.” The Girls Who Print Day Mentors Panel, which immediately followed the ceremony, featured several industry leaders who also happen to be strong female role models. There are very few careers that you can choose that will give you as much opportunity for growth as the print industry. “Just because you came in one area doesn’t mean that you can’t move,” McGrew explained. “Just because Deborah Corn is overwhelmed at being named the “Girlie Award” winner. you are coming in as a design expert doesn’t mean that you can’t grow into a marketing position or sales position; some sales people I know started off as something different.” Vanica Carr agreed. “There is so much Bling, Bling; Specialty Finishing Is a Necessity Specialty fi nishing is a necessity, said industry representatives during the “Vini, Vidi, Varnish: Conquering the Art of Finishing” panel at the Printerverse Theater (Booth 701), which was moderated by Deborah Corn, Principal at Print Media Centr. “It should be an added value, but it is a necessity, explained Matt Giandonato, Application Specialist, North America, Scodix (Booth 1037). “Everyone is doing ink on paper and you want your customers to stand out and have them say ‘wow’. Finishing is a part of the process that can allow it to stand out.” Ellen Manning, Vice President Marketing and Sales, Eagle Systems, Inc., said Eagle Systems (Booth opportunity,” Carr says. “We have a lot of people who unfortunately go into a job not refl ective of their degree. I am one of those; I went for political science. If you come out of school and you have this expertise to communicate and understand the ways people communicate, it gives you a unique opportunity to provide your employer to grow.” Mistakes will be made, and the benefi t of making mistakes are the lessons learned, panelists said. “It has been making mistakes in all the jobs I have had which brings me to where I am today,” says Jules Van Sant. “Lots and lots of failing, but through every failures, I became better. The value in is trying and understanding that every experience brings you to the next place.” 2625) is helping customers who want to use foil in their packaging. “The younger generation is doing the buying now and they want bling.” Differentiate or die is what John Palazzolo, Director, Marketing & Sales, Adphos (Booth 1019) said. You have to have something that stands out. “Because of the drying curing process we are a bling enabler instead of bringing the bling,” he said. Corn pointed to an example she noticed in the isles at the grocery strore and cereal boxes. “You will be amazed at the specialty fi nishing,” said Corn. “The kids really gravitate towards that and are the ones asking their parents to grab it, touch it.” Deborah Corn of Print Media Centr hosts a panel on specialty fi nishing. 52 | September 28, 2016 | GRAPH EXPO 16 Offi cial Show Daily | PrintingNews.com


GraphExpo_ShowDaily_September_28_2016
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